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Buildings of Michigan

Kathryn Bishop Eckert

Buildings of the United States
Cloth · 672 pp. · 7 x 10 · ISBN 9780813931579 · $85.00 · May 2012
REV2 revised edition

This revised edition of Buildings of Michigan (first published in 1993) presents the architecture of the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan, which are surrounded by four of the Great Lakes. From the Greek, Gothic, Italianate, Queen Anne, and Richardsonian Romanesque structures of the nineteenth century to the international, renowned modern buildings of the mid-twentieth century and the green and sustainable buildings of the twenty-first century, this book explores Michigan's history and covers the full spectrum of high-style and vernacular architecture and the building materials particular to the state.

Surveying the architecture of Detroit and many other cities and villages, this volume examines such structures as early inns and houses along the Sauk Trail, the mine locations of the Copper and Iron ranges, the sandstone architecture of the Lake Superior region, the concrete buildings of Alpena, lighthouses and lifesaving stations of the Upper Great Lakes, the state's numerous bridges, the great houses of automobile industrialists in Grosse Pointe, the factories of Albert Kahn, the mid-twentieth-century buildings of Alden B. Dow and Minoru Yamasaki, and contributions of numerous local architects who have added to Michigan's architectural heritage.

This new edition introduces buildings from the recent past and the present; discusses broad, sweeping cultural landscapes, historical parks, greenways, and linear parks; and showcases triumphs in historic preservation. As Detroit transforms itself from a city with a declining population and without the economic stability of the automobile industry, the book looks at how the city is reinventing itself. (Examples include Midtown, where the huge medical, academic, and cultural centers spark residential and retail development; the Detroit riverfront, which connects to open land converted to gardens, parks, and greenways; the viable close-in historic Woodbridge and Corktown neighborhoods, where residents have stayed; and Ford Field, Comerica Park, and the downtown theaters and casinos that entertain visitors.) Linkages of buildings by geography and theme receive attention. Heritage areas, river corridors, and highway routes arrange buildings and natural areas into comprehensible groups, and over 400 illustrations--including photographs, maps, and drawings--enhance the more than 950 entries.

A volume in the Buildings of the United States series of the Society of Architectural Historians

About the author

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, an architectural historian and historic preservationist whose thirty-five years of experience have taken her throughout Michigan to study buildings and cultural landscapes and assist communities with preservation activities, is Michigan's past State Historic Preservation Officer and a former advisor to the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the author of several books, including The Sandstone Architecture of the Lake Superior Region and The Campus Guide: Cranbrook.